Unicode Code Points

The “characters” in strings (and as standalone values) are Unicode code points, normally represented by #U+... for enough hexadecimal digits to represent the code point. Leading zeroes are not required (but may be necessary, see below).

You can input a specific character with #\X for some X, a UTF-8 code point.

There are a limited number of #\{newline} named characters.

code-points.idio
;; ħ is U+0127 LATIN SMALL LETTER H WITH STROKE
c1 := #U+127

c2 := #\ħ

;; the unicode type is much like fixnum and can be compared with eqv?
printf "Does <<%s>> eqv? <<%s>>? %s\n" c1 c2 (eqv? c1 c2)

;; SPACE
c1 = #U+20

;; or using a named character
c2 = #\{space}

printf "Does <<%s>> eqv? <<%s>>? %s\n" c1 c2 (eqv? c1 c2)
$ idio code-points
Does <<ħ>> eqv? <<ħ>>? #t
Does << >> eqv? << >>? #t

There are a number of Unicode-derived Category and Property predicates and a very limited set of conversion functions.

unicode-functions.idio
c1 := #U+127

if (Lowercase? c1) {
  printf "%s ->Uppercase %s\n" c1 (->Uppercase c1)
}

;; tell me what you know!
unicode/describe c1
$ idio unicode-functions
ħ ->Uppercase Ħ
0127;;Ll;;;;;;;;;;0126;;0126 # Letter Lowercase Alphabetic Uppercase=0126 Titlecase=0126

Last built at 2024-07-18T06:11:47Z+0000 from 77077af (dev) for Idio 0.3