JSON

Idio can read and write JSON, the data interchange format. Technically, it reads and writes JSON5 (a superset of JSON) and can write JSON.

Few systems use JSON5 so you will probably write JSON most of the time.

Reading

You can read JSON from strings, files and from file descriptors. The value returned will be an appropriate Idio type – often a hash table for the JSON object type.

The Idio source contains the example test files from https://spec.json5.org:

reading-json.idio
import json5

data := parse-file "ext/json5/src/examples/spec.json5.org/1.2.json5"

printf "data is %s\n" data
printf "andIn is %s\n" data."andIn"

With the output edited for readability:

$ idio reading-json
data is #{
     ("lineBreaks" & "Look, Mom! No \\n's!")
     ("backwardsCompatible" & "with JSON")
     ("andIn" & #[ "arrays" ])
     ("andTrailing" & 8.675309e+06)
     ("leadingDecimalPoint" & 8.675308e-01)
     ("positiveSign" & 1)
     ("trailingComma" & "in objects")
     ("unquoted" & "and you can quote me on that")
     ("hexadecimal" & 912559)
     ("singleQuotes" & "I can use \"double quotes\" here")
     }
andIn is #[ "arrays" ]

You’ll note some idiosyncrasies, in particular that JSON5’s use of (ECMAScript’s) IdentifierName as object MemberNames are converted to Idio strings (rather than symbols) and numeric conversions may differ.

Writing

You can generate JSON(5) from appropriate Idio values: constants, strings, arrays and hash tables.

JSON

Here, we’ll create a JSON-friendly hash table and generate both JSON5 and JSON from it.

writing-json.idio
import json5

data := #{}
data."literals" = #[ #t #f #n ]
data."numbers" = #[ +1 -1 1.0 ]
data."strings" = #[ "hello" "the \U1F3BC musical score" ]

printf "data is %s\n" data

json5-str := generate data
printf "JSON5 is %s\n" json5-str
printf "JSON is the same? %s\n" (equal? json5-str (generate-json data))

The output has been edited for readability:

$ idio writing-json
data is #{
     ("strings" & #[ "hello" "the 🎼 musical score" ])
     ("literals" & #[ #t #f #n ])
     ("numbers" & #[ 1 -1 1.000000e+00 ])
}
JSON5 is {
  "strings": [
      "hello",
      "the 🎼 musical score"
    ],
  "literals": [
      true,
      false,
      null
    ],
  "numbers": [
      1,
      -1,
      1.0e+0
    ]
}
JSON is the same? #t

Here, the JSON and JSON5 output being the same won’t be honoured, in general, as we can’t guarantee the order in which the keys of a hash table are processed.

JSON5

This time, we’ll create a JSON5 hash table and only generate JSON5 (as the elements are beyond the capabilities of JSON).

writing-json5.idio
import json5

data := #{}
data.'literals = #[ -Infinity -NaN ]
data.'numbers = #[ #xdecaf #x-C0FFEE ]
data.'strings = #[ "hello" "the \U1F3BC musical score" ]

printf "data is %s\n" data

printf "JSON5 is %s\n" (generate data)

The output has been edited for readability:

$ idio writing-json5
data is #{
     (literals & #[ -Infinity -NaN ])
     (numbers & #[ 912559 -12648430 ])
     (strings & #[ "hello" "the 🎼 musical score" ])
}
JSON5 is {
  literals: [
      -Infinity,
      -NaN
    ],
  numbers: [
      912559,
      -12648430
    ],
  strings: [
      "hello",
      "the 🎼 musical score"
    ]
}

Last built at 2023-11-09T07:11:41Z+0000 from 77077af (dev) for Idio 0.3